The Dutch language is another of the world’s ancient language, and according to Wikipedia, nearly thirty million people speak Dutch as a primary or secondary language in the world today. In addition, most people who speak Dutch can also speak German or English, since the three languages intermingle in most areas where Dutch is a native language. This includes the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, Aruba, parts of France, Saint Maarten, and Curacao. Languages such as Afrikaans and West Frisian are considered daughter—offshoot—languages of Dutch as well by some, although others say they are more accurately called sister languages, since each incorporates loan words from other languages and has distinct differences.

Most who speak the Dutch language say that it is a conglomeration of German and English, with a few native languages mixed in over the years. One of the most popular language misconceptions in the world is the confusion of the words Dutch and Deutsch, since “Dutch” is the language of the Netherlands and “Deutsch” is the native word for the German language.

There are many dialects of the Dutch language, including:

Dutch Low Saxon (with a few sub-dialects, also the main Dutch dialect spoken today)

  • Gronings
  • South GuelderishDutch Low Saxon (with a few sub-dialects, also the main Dutch dialect spoken today)
  • Gronings
  • South Guelderish
  • Brabantian (with several sub-dialects)
  • Limburgish (also known as a separate language sometimes)
  • East and West Flemish
  • Hollandish (also has several sub-dialects)
  • Brabantian (with several sub-dialects)
  • Limburgish (also known as a separate language sometimes)
  • East and West Flemish
  • Hollandish (also has several sub-dialects)
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